An old Fig Tree in Ayia Napa, Cyprus

Ayia Napa monastery is located in the southern part of the Famagusta district in Cyprus. The first buildings in Napa date back to the 12th century. At that time, a church and a mansion was built for the arriving Crusaders during a period when Cyprus was still part of the Byzantine Empire. After the conquest by the Venetians in 1489, the existing complex was converted into a monastery and structural changes were made; pilgrims received a large dormitory, and vacant rooms on the east side of the monastery were converted into monk cells. The point of attraction for Christians of all religions was the miraculous icon of Maria, which can still be visited today in the caves of the church. After the Ottoman conquest in 1571, the monastery was transferred to the Orthodox Church and abandoned, after a short flowering, in the 18th century.

Fig Tree in Ayia Napa, Cyprus

Fig Tree in Ayia Napa, Cyprus

What particularly impressed me during my visit to this former monastery was the more than 600-year-old fig tree in front of the southern entrance of this historically important site. If this tree could speak, it would have many stories to tell, from the Byzantine and Venetian merchants, about the pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem, the monks and popes of the monastery, the rulers of the Ottoman Empire, the warlike conflicts that were fought in its shadow, but also about the transformation of a formerly idyllic place into a loud and shrill party mile of our modern times just a few steps behind the monastery. The age of this sublime tree and its experience weigh so heavily that its low-hanging branches must be carried with iron columns!

Monastery in Ayia Napa

Monastery in Ayia Napa

Das Kloster Ayia Napa befindet sich im südlichen Teil des Bezirks Famagusta auf Zypern. Die ersten Gebäude in Napa stammen aus dem 12. Jahrhundert. Zu dieser Zeit, als Zypern noch Teil des Byzantinischen Reiches war, wurde eine Kirche und ein Herrenhaus für die ankommenden Kreuzfahrer gebaut. Nach der Eroberung durch die Venezianer im Jahr 1489 wurde der bestehende Komplex in ein Kloster umgewandelt und bauliche Veränderungen vorgenommen. Pilger bekamen einen großen Schlafsaal, und leere Räume auf der Ostseite des Anlage wurden in Mönchszellen umgewandelt. Anziehungspunkt für Christen aller Religionen war die wundrbringende Ikone der Maria, welche man heute noch in den Gewölben der Kirche besuchen kann. Nach der osmanischen Eroberung im Jahr 1571 wurde das Kloster der orthodoxen Kirche übertragen und nach einer kurzen Blüte im 18. Jahrhundert aufgegeben.

Monastery in Ayia Napa

Monastery in Ayia Napa

Was mich bei meinem Besuch in diesem ehemaligen Kloster besonders beeindruckte, war der über 600 Jahre alte Feigenbaum vor dem südlichen Eingang dieses historisch bedeutsamen Ortes. Wenn dieser Baum sprechen könnte, hätte er viele Geschichten zu erzählen, von den byzantinischen und venezianischen Händlern, den Pilgern auf dem Weg nach Jerusalem, den Mönchen und Popen des Klosters, den Herrschern des Osmanischen Reiches, den kriegerischen Auseinandersetzungen in seinem Schatten, aber auch über die Verwandlung eines ehemals idyllischen Ortes in eine laute und schrille Partymeile unserer modernen Zeit welche sich nur ein paar wenige Schritte hinter dem Kloster befindet. Das Alter dieses erhabenen Baums und sein Erlebtes wiegen so schwer, dass seine tief hängenden Äste mit Eisenstützen getragen werden müssen!

Categories: Blogroll, Cyprus, History, Monument, Nature, Travel | Tags: , | 5 Comments

Post navigation

5 thoughts on “An old Fig Tree in Ayia Napa, Cyprus

  1. cyprus is real historic country

    Liked by 1 person

  2. A 600+ yo fig tree?! That’s impressive!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This fig tree has many things to offer to its visitor from a different angle.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. These pics are beautiful!!!!!
    XOXO Reni

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I like Figs and now I know where it comes from haha!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Nomad Dummy Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: